Jerome Locson

Program Manager, Google for Education 

BS Computer Science 2009

Briefly describe the work that you do now.
I am a Program Manager helping the Google for Education programs in the Philippines. We help schools and universities adapt IT solutions that Google is offering to the academe, from platforms like Google Apps for Education, contents, and devices. We help assess IT infrastructure readiness of schools, help support deployment, and do professional development (technical) trainings.

 

What is the relationship between your work now and what you studied in college?
I studied Computer Science. Google is a tech company. What I basically do is technical and deals a lot with technology and how we can encourage our stakeholders adapt it. I believe it takes someone with a technical background and the passion to help the academe to really understand their needs and how to deliver this to them. (I feel) I am an educator by heart.

 

Describe yourself as an ATENEO student.

I was timid and shy during my first few years in college, I didn’t mingle a lot. After class, I usually go home or spend time in the library- I worked at the library as a Student Assistant for a year, I think. But later when I got back after my drop-out years, I was more open --- joined some communities, did some talks and trainings. More “present” across the campus, especially in the CS Department.

 

Can you tell me more about these “drop out years”?

I dropped out of college, twice. (2002 and 2004, if I recall it correctly). I got addicted to web development and designing during the early years of my college. We were not taught in this area. I got so into it and spent much of my free time at the Computer Laboratory. It came to a point that once I consumed all my Internet and Computer lab hours, I will go to computer rental shops to continue learning. I spent too much money doing overnight work in these shops, going home at 5 or 6 in the morning (causing me to) miss my morning classes. We did not own a Personal Computer (PC) then. When opportunities came, I left Zamboanga for Manila for a while. It happened twice. Thus, dropping out twice. But no regrets. Learned a lot from the experience.

 

Describe ATENEO during your time there as a student.
I remember the old backfield. It was empty, not like what we have right now. ATENEO way back then was “relaxed” in terms of the ambience; more spaces, not crowded. I like it like that.

 

What is the best thing about being an ADZU graduate?
Of course the name, it brings prestige and honor. ATENEO education is one of the best in the country. MAGIS. CURA PERSONALIS. PRO DE ET PATRIA. These are the IGNATIAN values I’ve learnt being a graduate from ADZU and I value that. So, thank you!

 

Name three people from ATENEO who made an impact on you – classmates, friends, teachers, etc. and why.
I have a lot but Ryan Dulaca, Ebony Domingo, and Greg Montano --- these three CS teachers served as my mentors, to study hard and explore the full potential of the Computer Science field. And they are great teachers!

 

Briefly describe the work that you do now.

I am a Program Manager helping the Google for Education programs in the Philippines. We help schools and universities adapt IT solutions that Google is offering to the academe, from platforms like Google Apps for Education, contents, and devices. We help assess IT infrastructure readiness of schools, help support deployment, and do professional development (technical) trainings.

 

What is the relationship between your work now and what you studied in college?
I studied Computer Science. Google is a tech company. What I basically do is technical and deals a lot with technology and how we can encourage our stakeholders adapt it. I believe it takes someone with a technical background and the passion to help the academe to really understand their needs and how to deliver this to them. (I feel) I am an educator by heart.

 

Describe yourself as an ATENEO student.
I was timid and shy during my first few years in college, I didn’t mingle a lot. After class, I usually go home or spend time in the library- I worked at the library as a Student Assistant for a year, I think. But later when I got back after my drop-out years, I was more open --- joined some communities, did some talks and trainings. More “present” across the campus, especially in the CS Department.

 

Can you tell me more about these “drop out years”?

I dropped out of college, twice. (2002 and 2004, if I recall it correctly). I got addicted to web development and designing during the early years of my college. We were not taught in this area. I got so into it and spent much of my free time at the Computer Laboratory. It came to a point that once I consumed all my Internet and Computer lab hours, I will go to computer rental shops to continue learning. I spent too much money doing overnight work in these shops, going home at 5 or 6 in the morning (causing me to) miss my morning classes. We did not own a Personal Computer (PC) then. When opportunities came, I left Zamboanga for Manila for a while. It happened twice. Thus, dropping out twice. But no regrets. Learned a lot from the experience.

 

Describe ATENEO during your time there as a student.
I remember the old backfield. It was empty, not like what we have right now. ATENEO way back then was “relaxed” in terms of the ambience; more spaces, not crowded. I like it like that.

 

What is the best thing about being an ADZU graduate?
Of course the name, it brings prestige and honor. ATENEO education is one of the best in the country. MAGIS. CURA PERSONALIS. PRO DE ET PATRIA. These are the IGNATIAN values I’ve learnt being a graduate from ADZU and I value that. So, thank you!

 

Name three people from ATENEO who made an impact on you – classmates, friends, teachers, etc. and why.
I have a lot but Ryan Dulaca, Ebony Domingo, and Greg Montano --- these three CS teachers served as my mentors, to study hard and explore the full potential of the Computer Science field. And they are great teachers!

 

Favorite teacher? Why?
Ryan Dulaca! If you went to attend one of his classes, you’ll know why. Aside from being a great teacher and mentor, he’s very strict but knows your potential. Just make sure you exert effort. I almost failed on his subject! Computer Science is tough but super fun! He’s a good friend until now.

 

Favorite subject? Why?
Computer Science subjects (Automata, Logic, Computer Networking, Mobile Development, and many more). It’s fun to learn stuff behind all these technologies we have. Computer Science brings wonders and awesome innovations. I got to use my brain exhaustively.

 

What was your course and why did you choose it?
BS Computer Science. I actually have a funny story about this.

When I graduated in High School, I was really aiming to take BS Chemistry or BS Physics, at WMSU. I love Natural Sciences. But I failed to take the entrance exam because I overslept. So, second option was ADZU since I passed the entrance exam. The thing here is that we cannot afford the tuition and other fees; then I applied for a scholarship grant. I got a scholarship from CHED, but I have to either take BS Education or BS Computer Science. So I said, I feel I did not want to teach in the future, so I ticked the form with BS Computer Science as first choice. And besides, it has “science” on its name so yeah, still in the “science” field but not so “natural” anymore.

 

What do you know now that you wish you knew then?
A lot of things actually. But one thing that I really appreciate with the things I know now that we students were afraid of way back then was failing. We should not be afraid of failures. Failure is one of the best teachers. I failed a lot but with a goal in mind, plus dedication and perseverance, we can attain our dreams.

 

 

ADZU 15 Questions is a Q & A series with ADZU alumni. As you can already guess, alumni will be asked 15 questions about their present lives as well as their lives during their time as an ADZU student.

 

This interview was conducted by ADZU communications officer Yen Blanco-Delgado via Facebook chat on June 08, 2015.

 

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